Making Time to Write

I posed the question “When do you write?” to my Twitter follows and got the below responses.

Whatever you write, making time to do it, at times, can be extremely trying. We all have things going on our lives, whether it’s a day job, kids, family, friends, hobbies or a whole host of other parts of life, at it can be difficult to put time aside to sit down and write.

Recently I’ve found it harder than usual to get some writing down. If you read this blog regularly, you’ll know that I’ve recently started uni, and although I’m only in for a couple of days a week, it still eats up a lot of its time alongside house things. To add to our workload, because we can’t make life easy for ourselves, we’ve also just got a puppy. Although she is adorable and we wouldn’t change her, she is a lot of work, and as we’re currently trying to house train her, we have to constantly watch her, ready to put her outside at a moments notice. So being able to take some time out and sit and do some writing just isn’t happening at the minute.

Having said this, however, on a Monday, I have an hour for dinner between my lectures, so I’ve been taking a bit of time to eat and get some writing done. So far, this is working pretty well for me, and I’ve been able to write at least a few hundred words in the given time, which isn’t half bad.

It’s been a little bit frustrating at late not being able to write when I want to as I’ve had a tonne of ideas and have had to settle for just making notes instead and hopefully understanding what they mean when I come to go through them. At the moment not being able to write can’t be helped, sometimes other things in life just take priority. I’m just trying to get settled into uni and dog ownership and trying to not get too down on myself while I do it.

My current WIP, And Then I Killed Her, is coming along pretty well, and I’m slowly chipping away at the first draft. I’ve got plenty of notes to work with, and I’ve always got new ideas bouncing around my head. The story has already gone through several different versions and has probably been my most changed work so far. Some of this is because I’m starting to incorporate things that I’m learning in lectures and seeing things that didn’t quite work for one reason or another. I feel like this novel will probably end up being my most polished (after The Next Stage) as I’m taking my time with it to make it just right.

What To Write?

Being a writer sometimes means that you have to juggle your different ideas. I recently asked my fellow writers on Twitter how they decide which idea to work on;

I currently have around 9 ideas that are in various stages of development. Some are just a very basic idea, some have a number of notes written for them, and others have several chapters done.

I tend to flit between ideas often. If I have a new idea that I want to develop, I will spend some time working on that before continuing with previous ideas. Some stories come easier than others. For example, I got a bit stuck with my story It’s All in the Eyes, and then I had the idea for Blindsighted. I found the latter flowed smoother and quicker, and I could fully develop that into a release.

At the moment, I’m working on, And Then I Killed Her, which for now is coming freely. However, if I get stuck, I may move on to one of my other ideas.

Having said that, if I come up with a new idea – for example, I came up with an idea for a new story the other day that involves a homeless wizard – I may spend a few minutes writing a few sentences or jotting down the basic premise, but I won’t spend a great deal of time working on it.

Some books, like The Next Stage 2 and Creatures 2, are coming off the back of a previous entry, so I have a few ideas bouncing around of where I can take the story, but because – in my mind – they have to live up to the book that came before I spend a bit more time figuring things out. Creatures 2 is around halfway written, but I got a little stuck and decided that I would move on to something else rather than struggling with it.

It can be a blessing and a curse to have a lot of ideas bouncing around. On the one hand, it’s great because you’ve always got something to work on if you have issues with a current WIP. But on the other, it can be a pain because I want to work on several at a time. For example, I’m really excited about my wizard story, but my current serial killer WIP is going so well that I don’t want to stop writing it if I lose my flow.

As I’ve found from asking folks on Twitter, everyone has a different way of figuring out which story they will work on at any given time. As with many things, what works for one, might not work for you, so find your own method.